Lest We Forget - African American Military History by Researcher, 
					Author and Veteran Bennie McRae, Jr.

Soldiers Of The Army Of The James - Correspondence to Soldiers from ED W. Smith

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA,
ARMY OF THE JAMES,
Before Richmond, October 11, 1864.


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SOLDIERS OF THE ARMY OF THE JAMES:
The time has come when it is due to you that some word should be said of your deeds.

In accordance with the plan committed to your by the lieutenant general commanding the armies, for the first time in the war, fully taking advantage of our facilities of steam marine transportation, you performed a march without parallel in the history of war.

At sunset of the 4th of May you were threatening the enemy's capital from West Point and the White House, within thirty miles on its eastern side.

Within twenty-four hours, at sunset on the 5th of May, by a march of 130 miles, you transported 35,000 men-their luggage, supplies, horses, wagons, and artillery-within fifteen miles of the south side of Richmond with such celerity and secrecy that the enemy were wholly unprepared for your coming, and allowed you without opposition to seize the strongest natural position on the continent. A victory all the more valuable become bloodless!

Seizing the enemy's communications between their capital and the south you held them till the 26th of May.

Meanwhile, your cavalry, under General August V. Kantz, cut the Weldon road below Petersburg twice over and destroyed a portion of the Danville railroad, while the colored cavalry, under Col. Robert M. West, joined you by a march from Williamsburg across the Chickahominy to Harrison's Landing.

From the 12th to the 16th of May, you "moved on the enemy's works" around Fort Darling, holding him in check while your cavalry cut the Danville Road, capturing his first line of works, repulsing with great slaughter his attack, which was intended for your destruction.

Retiring at leisure to your position, you fortified it, repulsing three several attacks of the enemy, until you have made it strong enough to hold itself.

Fortifying City Point, Fort Powhatan, Wilson's Wharf (Fort Pocahontas), you secured your communications, and have practically moved fortress Monroe as a base within fifteen miles of the rebel capital there to remain till that travels.

Re-embarking after you had secured your position with nearly your whole effective strength, under Maj. Gen. William F. Smith, you again appeared at White House within forty-eight hours after you received the order to march, participating at the memorable battle of Cold Harbor with the Army of the Potomac, where the number and character of your gallant dead attest your bravery and conduct. Again returning in advance of that army on the 15th of June, under General Smith, the Eighteenth Corps captured the right of the line of defenses around Petersburg, and nine pieces of artillery, which lines you have since held for three months.

On the 16th of June a portion of the Tenth Corps, Under Brig. Gen. Alfred H. Terry, again threw itself upon the enemy's communications between Richmond and Petersburg, and destroyed miles of the road, and holding it cut for days.

The Tenth Corps on the 14th day of August passing the James at Deep Bottom, under Maj. Gen. David B. Bilrney, by a series of brilliant charges carried the enemy's works near New market, and, two days later, another line of works at Fussell's Mill defended by the best troops of Lee's army, bringing back four guns and three battle flags as trophies of their valor.

Again crossing the James on the 29th of September, with both corps with celebrity, precision, secresy, and promptness of movements seldom equaled, with both corps in perfect co-operation, you assaulted and carried at the same moment - the Tenth Corps and the Third Division of the Eighteenth Corps, under General Birney-the enemy's strong works with double lines of abatis at Spring Hill, near New Market while the remaining divisions of the Eighteenth Corps, under Maj. Gen. Edward O. C. Ord, carried by assault Battery Harrison, capturing twenty-two pieces of heavy ordinance-the strongest of the enemy's works around Richmond.

The army thus possessed itself of the outer line of the enemy's works and advanced to the very gates of Richmond. So vital was your success at Battery Harrison that on the 1st of October (September 30), under the eye of General Lee himself, massing his best troops, the enemy made most determined assaults upon your lines to retake it and were driven back with the loss of seven battle flags and the almost annihilation of a brigade (Clingman's). After a week's preparation, massing all his veteran troops on your right flank, on the 7th of October the enemy drove in the cavalry, with the loss of some pieces of horse artillery, but meeting the steady troops of the Tenth Corps were repulsed with slaughter, losing three commanders of brigades killed and wounded, and many field and line officers and men killed, wounded, and prisoners.

Such is the glorious records of the Army of the James-never beaten in a battle, never repulsed in an assault by a larger portion of its forces than a brigade.

All these triumphs have not been achieved with out many loved and honored dead.

Why should we mourn their departure? Their names have passed into history emblazoned on the proud roll of their country's patriots heroes.

Yet we drop a fresh tear for the gallant General H. Burnham-a devoted soldier leading his brigade to the crest of Battery Harrison, where he fell amid the cheers of the victorious charge. In his memory Battery Harrison will be officially designated Fort Burnham.

Of the colored soldiers of the Third Divisions of the Eighteenth and Tenth Corps and the officers who led them, the general commanding desires to make special mention.

In the charge of the enemy's works by the colored division of the Eighteenth Corps at Spring Hill, New Market-better men were never better led, better officers never led better men. With hardly an exception officers of colored troops will be the post of honor in the American armies. The colored soldiers by coolness, steadiness, and determined courage and dash have silenced every cavil of the doubters of their soldierly capacity, and drawn tokens of admiration from their enemies; have brought their late masters even to the consideration of the question whether they will not employ as soldiers the hitherto depised race. Be it so; this war is ended when a musket is in the hands of every ablebodied negro who wishes to use one.

In the present movement, where all have deserved so well, it is almost invidious to name, yet justice requires special gallant acts noticed.

Major Generals Ord and Birney receive the thanks of the commanding general for the prompt celebrity of the movement of their corps, both in time and manner, thereby securing thorough co-operation, although moving over different lines. Their active promptness cannot be too much commended as an example in other operations. To be able to move troops to exact time is a quality as scarce as it is valuable.

General Ord received a severe wound while directing he occupation of a captured redoubt. Brigadier-General Stannard is particularly distinguished for his gallantry in leading his division in the assault until he lost his arm. The commanding general takes pleasure to recommending General Stannard to promotion for meritorious services.

First Lieut. C. W. Cook, Twenty-first Connecticut, acting aide to Brigadier-General Stannard, has special mention for distinguished gallantry and is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of Connecticut for promotion.

All commanders of divisions and brigades acquitted themselves to the satisfaction of the commanding general in the flight. The manner of the march of some of the columns can and will be improved.


EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS

FIRST DIVISION

In the First Brigade, Lieutenant-Colonel Raulston, commanding, reports that his whole command behaved in so creditable a manner that he has no individual instances of gallant conduct to report.

Second Brigade

Asst. Surg. J. G. Proteous, One hundred and eighteenth New York Volunteers, deserves the highest credit for his bravery and attention to duties, being the only surgeon in the brigade advancing with his regiment in the charging column.

Lieut. Col. George F. Nichols, One hundred and eighteen New York Volunteers, deserves honorable mention for the gallant manner, with a small number of men with which he captured two redoubts on the right on the right of Fort Harrison, while the main assault was being made, and also for his cool conduct of the skirmish line in the general assault.

Lieutenant Campbell, One hundred and eighteenth New York, aide to Brigadier-General Burnham, carried an order to the assaulting column when near the brow of the fort under a heavy fire-a most gallant act.

Lieuts. N. J. Gibbs and H. J. Adams of the same regiment, the first men in the redoubts are commended for their presence of mind in turning the enemy's guns to bear upon them. They are respectfully recommended to his excellency the Governor of New York for promotion.

Corpl. Michael Finegan, One hundred and eighteenth New York, is reported for his cool and humorous courage in capturing a rebel, forcing him to stand on the parapet, face the enemy, and give three hearty cheers for the Union.

Col. Michael T. Donohoe, Tenth, New Hampshire Volunteers, has credit for the gallant manner in which he advanced his skirmish line from Aiken's Landing, having his horse shot under him, and afterward being severely wounded.

Private James Bradbury (James Brady) * Tenth New Hampshire Volunteers, is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal for gallantry in capturing a rebel stand of colors.

William S. Simmons and Jacob Bishop, color-sergeants of the Eighth Connecticut Volunteers, are commended for planning their colors on the parapet of the fort among the earliest. Sergeants Bishop and Simmons are promoted to second lieutenants in the U. S. Colored Troops with the approval of the President.

Corpl. Nathan E. Hickock,* Eighth Connecticut Volunteers has honorable mention for his gallantry in capturing a rebel battle-flag and is recommended to the Secretary of War for a metal. His colonel will see that he had his warrant as a sergeant.

Chaplain Nathan Werdner, of the Ninety-sixth New York Volunteers, is specially commended for charging with his regiments in the advancing column, ready to administer the lasting consolations to the dying.

Sergt. Lester Archer,* of the Ninety-sixth New York, has honorable mention for his gallantry in placing the colors of his regiments on Battery Harrison. There is a generous rivalry between the color bearers of the Eighth Connecticut and the Ninety-sixth New York as to which were the first in planting their colors-so nearly equal were they that it is difficult to say which were in advance. May that rivalry always continue.

Capt. Enoch W. Goss, of the Thirteenth New Hampshire Volunteers is commended for leading the skirmish line and the capture of prisoners and battle-flags after the enemy's charge of the 30th, in which 18 commissioned officers and 209 men were captured. Actg. Adjt. Walter P. Long, Twenty-First Connecticut Volunteers is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of Connecticut for promotion for gallantly planting his colors among the first on the rebel fortifications.

Corpl. F. Clarence Buck,* Company A. Twenty-first Connecticut (sharpshooter battalion) is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal for courage. Although wounded in the arm, he refused to leave the field until the engagement closed. In addition, he will have his warrant as sergeant.

Third Brigade

Capt Cecil Clay,* Fifty-eight Pennsylvania Volunteers, has honorable mention. His color bearer being shot, he planted his colors on the fortifications of Battery Harrison, and was severely wounded in the act. He is recommended to his Excellency the Governor of Pennsylvania for promotion.

Sergt, Patterson T. Campbell, Company F. Fifty-eight Pennsylvania is noticed as capturing the first prisoner in the fort-a rebel captain. He is promoted to a lieutenancy in the colored troops.

Sergt. Nathaniel A. McKown,* Company B. Fifty-eight Pennsylvania, advanced in front of our lines after the repulse of the enemy, capturing a rebel battle flag under severe picket fire.. He is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal for gallantry. Sergeant McKown is promoted for good conduct to a lieutenant in the Sixth U. S. Colored Troops.

Corpl. Samuel Clapper, Company D, One hundred and eighty-eight Pennsylvania, is recommended for a medal for gallant services in bringing off the colors of the Ninety-second New York-its own color sergeant being wounded.

Corpl. Charles Blucher,* Company H. One hundred and eighty-eight Pennsylvania, planted the first national colors on the fortifications in the charge of September 29. He is recommended to the Secretary of War for gallantry, and will have the warrant of a sergeant.

Corpl. William Graul,* Company I, One hundred and eighty-eight Pennsylvania, first planted the colors of his State on the fortifications of the enemy. He is recommended for a metal for gallant conduct.

Theodore Kramer,* Company G, One hundred and eight-eighth Pennsylvania, took one of the first prisoners, a captain, in the charge of the 29th, and is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

Sergt. William E. Gibson, Company K, Sergt. John Flanagan, Company I, and Sergt, Frank M. Hawley, Company B, One hundred and eighty-eight Pennsylvania, were conspicuous for humane daring in volunteering to bring off the wounded under a heavy fire September 29. There are some who will carry wounded to the rear; these sergeants brought them from the front. Sergeants Gibson, Flanagan, and Hawley are promoted for good conduct and soldierly bearing to lieutenants in the U. S. Colored Troops.

Private Joseph H. Shea,* Ninety-second New York, is recommended for a medal for like gallant conduct in bringing the wounded from the field under fire of the enemy after the retirement of the line.

The First Division of the Eighteenth Army Corps and the One hundred and fifty-eighth New York will be entitled to inscribe Battery Harrison on their colors. The quartermaster will furnish a new stand of colors with inscription for each regiment.

SECOND DIVISION

Surg. George De Landre, One hundred and fifty-eighth New York while under fire, worked faithfully day and night, dressing the wounds of those who required attention, without reference to corps. It is to be deplored that our regulations allow substantially no promotion to a surgeon; but for a gallant man to do his dusty in such a manner is sufficient reward.

Sergt. Armand D. Alleaume, Company A, One hundred and fifty eight New York, for soldierly coolness in turning the captured guns upon the enemy, is promoted to captain of U. S. Colored Troops.

Samuel Graham, color-sergeant One hundred and fifty-eighth New York, is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal for conspicuous gallantry and bravery in the assault upon the second line of works, and is promoted as first lieutenant in the U. S. Colored Troops.

Sergt. William Laing,* Company F. One hundred and fifty-eighth New York, conspicuous for being among the first to scale the parapet, is recommended for a medal. Has since died of his wounds. His medal will be sent to his family.

First Sergt. Thomas Meagher,* Company G, One hundred and fifty-eighth New York, who led a section of his men on the enemy's works receiving a wound while calling the parapet, is recommended for a medal for his gallantry.

Privates Schiller* and Grube,* Company E., One hundred and fifty-eighth New York, are commended for advancing to the ditch of the enemy's works, although obliged to fall back, being unsupported Schiller and Grube are recommended for medals for gallant conduct.

Corporal Murphy,* Company K, One hundred and fifty-eighth New York, distinguished himself by capturing a rebel battle flag, for which service he received a twenty days furlough and $25 from the commanding general.

Corporal Vanwinkle,* Privates Henry s. Wella* and George A. Buchanan,* One hundred and forty-eighth New York, are recommended to severally received medals from the Secretary of War, for distinguished gallantry in taking positions in advance of the skirmish line, within short distance of the enemy's gunners, driving the cannoneers from their guns. Private Buchanan has since died of his wounds. The medal will be sent to his family. Vanwinkle and Wells will receive warrants as sergeants.

Augustine Flanagan,* sergeant company A, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania color bearer, conspicuous for bravery in charging on the enemy's works on the 29th of September, rushing forward with his colors, waving them and calling upon his men to follow, until he fell severely wounded. He is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

Sergt. Hezekiah Hammer, Company K, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania with great fearlessness rushed forward, seized the colors from the wounded color bearer, and brought them off the field, and is recommended for promotion another grade for his gallantry (being already a lieutenant) to His Excellency the Governor of Pennsylvania. Would that his whole regiment had emulated his example.

 

ENGINEER CORPS

First Lieut. Peter S. Michie, of the U. S. Engineer Corps, acting chief engineer of the Army of the James, has most honorable mention for the zeal and energy of his services, unremitting and unwearied as well with the pontoon train as in the fortifications of the line. He is earnestly recommended to the President of the United States for brevets of captain and major.

Capt J. W. Lyon, Fourth Rhode Island, in command of the pontoon trains of the Army of the James, receives commendation for his energy ability, and promptness in the construction of the pontoon bridges by which the army crossed the river.

Capt John L. Suess, First New York Engineers, has honorable mention for energy in prosecuting the work which enabled our forces to hold Fort Harrison. He has already lost an arm in the service and is recommended to his Excellency the governor of New York for promotion.

Capt Hiram Farrand, First New York Engineers, for his energy and efficiency in constructing the line of intrenchments on the line of the Eighteenth Army Corps-receiving a very severe wound in the discharge of his duty. He is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of New York for promotion.

The services of the officers and the men of the Engineer Corps, although not as conspicuous as those of some other troops, are quite as arduous requiring constancy, courage, and zeal, and are fully appreciated.

THIRD DIVISION

Brig. Gen. Charles J. Paine has received the thanks for Major-General Birney for the conduct of his division while temporarily acting with the Tenth Corps in the action of the 29th of September, near New Market.

Col. S. A. Duncan, Fourth U. S. Colored Troops, commanding Third Brigade, in addition to other gallant services in the field heretofore, fell wounded near the enemy's works. He is recommended to the President for a brevet rank as brigadier-general.

Col. A. G. Draper, Thirty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops, commanded Second Brigade, carried his brigade in column of assault with fixed bayonets over the enemy's works through a double lines of abatis after severe resistance. For incessant attention to duty and gallantry in action, Colonel Draper is also recommended to brevet rank as brigadier general.

Lieut. Col. G. W. Shurleff, Fifth U. S. Colored Troops, gallantly led his regiment in the assault of the 29th, although at the commencement of the charge was shot through the wrist and again wounded until he received a third and probably mortal wound close to the enemy's works. He has nobly earned his promotion and his commission as colonel of his regiment to date from the 29th of September, subject to the approval of the President.

First Lieut. Edwin C. Gaskill, Thirty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops, for distinguished gallantry in leading his men when shot through the arm, within twenty years of the enemy's works. He is promoted to a captain.

First Lieut. Richard F. Andrews, Thirty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops has honorable mention. Having been two months sick and relieved from duty he volunteered and charged with his command through the swamp where he received a wound. He is promoted to the rank of captain.

First Lieut. James B. Backup, Thirty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops, excused from duty for lameness, from which he could walk but a short, distance, volunteered and charged with his command through the swamp, and received a wound through the breast. He is promoted to a captain.

Private James Gardiner,* Company I. Thirty-sixth, U. S. Colored Troops, rushed in advance of his brigade, shot at a rebel officer, who was on the parapet cheering his men, and then ran him through with his bayonet. He will have a sergeant's warrant and a medal for gallant daring.

Capt. Phillip Weinmann, Sixth U. S. Colored Troops, commanding division of sharpshooters, and in charge of the skirmish line, is promoted to major for excellent conduct in managing his line of assault on the 29th of September.

Milton M. Holland,* Sergeant-Major, Fifth U. S. Colored Troops, commanding Company C; James H. Bronson,* First Sergeant, commanding Company D; Robert Pinn,* First Sergeant, commanding Company I, wounded; Powhatan Beaty,* first sergeant, commanding Company G, Fifth U. S. Colored Troops- all these gallant colored soldiers were left in command, all their company officers being killed or wounded, and led them gallantly and meritoriously through the day. For these services they have most honorable mention, and the commanding general will cause a special medal to be struck in honor of these gallant colored soldiers.

Capt. Peter Schlick, Thirty-eighth U. S. Colored Troops, was the first of his regiment to enter the rebel works in the assault of the 29th, and is promoted to major.

Lieutenant Bancrost, Thirty-eighth U. S. Colored Troops, has honorable mention for daring and endurance. Being shot through the hip at the swamp, he crawled forward on his hands and knees, waving his sword and cheering his men to follow.

Sergt. Maj. Martin Weisz, Thirty-eight U. S. Colored Troops for courage, gallantry, and good conduct in the attack on the New Market, is promoted to a lieutenant.

First Sergt. Edward Ratecliff,* Company C, Thirty-eighth U. S. colored Troops, thrown into command of this company by the death of the officer commanding, was the first enlisted man in the enemy's works, leading his company with great gallantry-for which he has a medal.

Private William H. Barnes,* Company C. Thirty-eighth U. S. Colored Troops, among the very first to enter the rebel works, although himself previously wounded, has a medal for his gallantry.

Sergeant Harris,* Company B, Thirty-eighth U. S. Colored Troops, has a medal for gallant conduct in the assault of the 29th instant.

First Lieut. J. Murray Hoag, Fourth U. S. Colored Troops, although on the sick list, and suffering from the effects of fever, insisted on leading his company, until he fell, wounded in two places, at the enemy's lines of abatis. He is promoted to captain.

Alfred B. Hilton,* color-sergeant, Fourth, U.S. Colored Troops the bearer of the national colors, when the color-sergeant with the regimental standard fell beside him, seized the standard, and struggled forward with both colors, until disabled by a severe wound at the enemy's inner line of abatis, and when on the ground he showed that his thoughts were for the colors and not for himself. He has a special medal for gallantry, and will have his warrant as first sergeant.

Christian A. Fleetwood,* sergeant-major, Fourth U.S. Colored Troops, when two color bearers had been shot down, seized the national colors and bore them nobly through the fight. He has a special medal for gallant conduct.

Charles Veal,* color bearer Company D, Fourth U. S. Colored Troops, after two bearers of the regimental color had been shot down, seized it close to the enemy's works and bore it through the remainder of the action. He has a medal for gallantry, and will have the warrant of color-sergeant.

Lieut. N. H. Edgerton, adjutant Sixth U. S. Colored Troops, when the color bearer was shot down, seized the colors and carried them forward, even after his own hand was pierced by a bullet which severed the flag-staff. He is promoted to the rank of captain.

Corpl. Miles James,* Thirty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops, after having his arm so badly mutilated that immediate amputation was necessary, loaded and discharged his piece with one hand, and urged his men forward; this within thirty yards of the enemy's works. He has a medal and a sergeant's warrant.

First Sergt. William Davis, Company E, Thirty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops, has honorable mention and a medal for gallantry.

Sergt. Samuel Gilchrist, Company K. Thirty-sixth U. S. Colored Troops, showed great bravery and gallantry in commanding his company after his officers were killed. He has a medal for gallantry.

Alexander Kelly,* first sergeant Company F, Sixth U. S. Colored Troops, gallantly seized the colors, which had fallen near the enemy's inner line of abatis, raised them, and rallied the men at a time of confusion and a place of the greatest possible danger. He has a medal for his gallantry.

Sergeant Eisbury, first sergeant Company G, Sixth U. S . Colored Troops, has a medal for bravery and remarkable coolness during the engagement of September 29, 1864.

Maj. J. B. Cook, Twenty-second U. S. Colored Troops, commanding his regiment as a skirmish line, behaved most gallantly himself and managed his men with marked ability in the assault on the enemy's lines near New Market. In the attempt of the enemy to take Fort Harrison he unfortunately fell wounded through is utter neglect of personal safety. He is promoted to lieutenant colonel.

Capt Robert Dollard, Second U. S. Colored Cavalry, acting as field officer and in charge of the skirmish line in the assault of New Market, September 29, inspired his command by his great personal bravery, coolness, and ability, until he fell severely wounded near the enemy's main line. He is promoted to major.

First Lieut. Henry Peterson, Second U. S. Colored Cavalry, is promoted to a captaincy for gallantry and ability in conducting his company at New Market on the 29th of September, and for meritorious conduct in field and camp.

Sergt. George Honesty, Company I, Second Colored Cavalry; First Sergt. Isaac Harris, Company F; Sergt. Gilbert Harris, Company F; Sergt; Reuben Parker, Company F; First Sergt. Randolph Driver, Company I. Have honorable mention for conspicuous bravery on the skirmish line in the assault on the enemy's works September 29. Each has a medal.

The regiments of this division having behaved with great gallantry in several actions, earning thereby the right to official notice, it is ordered that there be inscribed upon the colors of the First and Tenth U.S. Colored Troops the name Wilson's Wharf, that being the place where they defeated the cavalry of Fitzhugh Lee.

That the Second U. S. Colored Cavalry have inscribed the word Suffolk on their colors, for their conduct in the battle of March 9, near that place.

That the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Twenty-second U. S. Colored Troops have the word Petersburg inscribed on their banners, for their gallantry in capturing the line of works and the enemy's guns on the 15th of June, 1804, at that place.

That the first, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Twenty-second, Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh, Thirty-eighth U. S. Colored Troops and the Second U. S. Colored Cavalry have the words New Market Heights inscribed upon their colors, for their gallantry in carrying the enemy's works at that point on the 29th of September.

The quartermaster is directed to furnish a new stand of colors to each of these regiments, with the inscription ordered.


TENTH ARMY CORPS

FIRST DIVISION

First Brigade

First Sergt. William Hedges, Company I. Sixty-second Ohio, is commanded for cool and courageous conduct while in command of his company on the reconnaissance toward Richmond September 29. He is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of Ohio for promotion.

First Sergt. John R. Murray, Company G, Sixty-second Ohio for promotion for good conduct, having long been in command for his company.

Second Brigade

Col. Joseph C. Abbott, Seventh New Hampshire, commanding Second Brigade, First Division, is recommended for brevet for his gallant and soldierly conduct since the campaign commenced, and for the skillful and able manner in which his brigade was led to the rebel works within two miles of Richmond on the 1st instant.

First Sergt. William H. Haynes, Company G. Seventh Connecticut, is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of Connecticut for promotion for marked ability and attention to his duties as acting lieutenant.

First Sergt. Benjamin Hill, Company A. Seventh Connecticut, is honorably mentioned for gallantry on the skirmish line on the 29th of September in the reconnaissance on Richmond. He is appointed a second lieutenant in the U. S. Colored Troops.

Sergt. Lewis A. Cook, Company E, Seventh Connecticut, for gallantry on skirmish line and zeal in performance of duty, is recommended for a medal.

First Lieut, Jonathan H. Edgerly, Third New Hampshire, for gallantry in conducting the skirmish line on the 29th of September, as well as on the reconnaissance toward Richmond, is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of New Hampshire for promotion.

Sergt. Maj. George A. Gesner, Company K, Sixty Connecticut, is recommended for promotion to His Excellency the Governor of Connecticut for attention to his duties, and is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

First Lieut. Ferdinand Davis, Seventh New Hampshire, and acting aide on Brigadier-General Hawley's staff, is recommended to for gallantry.

Sergt. William Tilton,* Company C, Seventh New Hampshire, in command of pioneers, has special mention for gallantry, and is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

Sergt. Henry F. W. Little,* Company D, Seventh New Hampshire, for gallantry on the skirmish line on the reconnaissance toward Richmond, is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal. He is appointed first lieutenant in U. S. Colored Troops.

Sergt. Frank Robey (George F. Robie),* Company D, Seventh New Hampshire for gallantry on skirmish line, is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

Sergt, John A. Coburn, Company H, Seventh New Hampshire, was in command of his company in the reconnaissance toward Richmond, and is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of New Hampshire for promotion.

Sergt. George P. Dow,* Company C, Seventh New Hampshire, was in command of his company in the reconnaissance toward Richmond and behaved with gallantry. He is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

Third Brigade

Col F. A. Osborn, Twenty-fourth Massachusetts, for gallant and meritorious service through the campaign, has been recommended by the commanding general for promotion.

SECOND DIVISION

First Brigade

Corpl. Ebenezer Skellie,* Company D, One hundred and twelfth New York, took the colors of his regiment when the color-sergeant fell and carried them through the first charge. At the second charge, after all the color guard were killed or wounded, he carried the colors to the enemy's works, where he fell wounded. He has a medal and is recommended to the President, because of his wounds, to promotion in the Veteran Reserve Corps.

Second Brigade

Col N. M. Curtis, commanding Second Brigade, for his zealous and untiring efforts to make his brigade efficient, and for the manner in which he led it in action, is commended by his corps commander, and is recommended to the President to promotion by brevet.

First Lieuts. John J. Fitzgibbon, Company B, and James Cox, Company C. Forty-seventh New York, have honorable mention for gallantry in both assaults on the enemy's works, and are recommended to His Excellency the governor of New York for promotion.

Corpl. William F. Noonan, Company F, Forty-seventh New York when the color bearer was shot, seized the colors and bore them through the fight for which act and courage and daring and meritorious conduct he is appointed second lieutenant in colored troops.

First Sergt. John Curry, company B, Forty-seventh New York, is promoted to first lieutenant in U. S. Colored Troops, for gallant behavior in the assault and rallying his men.

First Sergt. Andrew Hamilton, Company H, Forty-seventh New York, for gallantry and coolness in assault, is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of New York for promotion.

Sergt. Richard Gosson,* Company K. Forty-seventh New York, fell dead while planting the colors of his regiment on the enemy's works. He is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal, to be sent to his family.

First Lieut. J. Wainwright, commanding Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, has honorable mention for the gallant manner in which he conducted the regiment during the engagement.

Second Lieut. William B. Eves, Company G, Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, behaved with especial gallantry in both assaults, and is recommended for promotion in his regiment to His Excellency the Governor of Pennsylvania.

Sergt. William H. Martin, Company A. Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, commanded his company in both assaults, and led his men with bravery and admirable order in the assault September 29 for which he has most honorable mention, and is recommended to His Excellency the governor of Pennsylvania for promotion to first lieutenant.

Corpl. David S. Harry, Company B, Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, is mentioned for special gallantry in both assaults of the 29th of September. He is appointed second lieutenant in U. S. Colored Troops.

Private William McCarty, Company d. Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, is honorably mentioned for special gallantry, bearing his colors in advance of his regiment in the absence of the color-sergeant, is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

First Lieut. A. Lippincott, forty-eight New York, has special mention for gallant conduct in both assaults, and is recommended for promotion in his regiment to His Excellency the Governor of New York.

Color Sergt. Tom Dawson, Forty-eighth New York, for coolness and courage, is recommended for promotion to His Excellency the Governor of New York.

Capt J. M. McDonald, Company H, Forty-seventh New York, is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of New York for promotion for the manner in which he conducted his regiment after taking command the colonel being wounded.

Lieut. Col. C. R. MacDonald, Forty-seventh New York, is commended for coolness and bravery in leading his command on the enemy's works and is recommended for promotion to His Excellency the Governor of New York.

Lieut. Col. J. S. Littell, of the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, is recommended to His Excellency to the Governor of Pennsylvania for promotion for gallantry and judgement in leading his command.

Third Brigade

Capt Robert J. Gray, Ninth Maine, was especially conspicuous for gallantry, and received his death wound while gallantly leading his regiment to the charge on Battery Gilmer.

Capt. Billings Brastow took command in the same charge after the death of Captain Gray, and was killed while in like gallant discharge of his duty.

Capt J. C. Beal then took command of the regiment, led it within thirty yards of Battery Gilmer, with great gallantry and courage.

Lieut. George S. Colbath, Ninth Maine , is recommended to the Governor of Maine for promotion for leading his command in the same charge, although suffering from an open wound received at Petersburg, and being again severely wounded.

Capt B. N. Smith, One hundred and sixty-ninth New York, for distinguished gallantry while in command of his regiment during the assault of the 29th of September, is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of New York for promotion.

Capt J. H. Lawrence, commanding Thirteenth Indians, being wounded in the first assault, still remained in command until ordered to the rear, is mentioned for gallantry and good conduct, and is recommended to His Excellency the Governor of Indiana for promotion.

Lieut. S. C. F. Smith, Ninth Maine, who, not having recovered from a wound received August 19, 1864, yet remained with his company till order to the rear, for zeal and efficient courage has honorable mention, and is recommended to His Excellency The Governor of Maine for promotion. Private Julius B. Koenig, One hundred and fifteenth New York, orderly at brigade headquarters, who carried the brigade flag with extraordinary zealousness in the hottest parts of the action, is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal for his gallantry.

Lieut. Solomon J. Watson, Ninth Maine, received his death wound from gallant daring in the endeavor to get the colors of his regiment from the field.

Color Sergt. C. L. F. Howe, Ninth Maine, conspicuous for daring, is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

Corpl. Z. Piche, Company D, Ninth Maine, carried one of the flags for a long time after he was wounded, is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

Private Thomas Belcher,* Company I, Ninth Maine has honorable mention and will be made color-sergeant of his regiment. He took a guidon from the hands of Private Parker, who was mortally wounded and carried it nearer Battery Gilmer than any other man; is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

Private B. E. Preble, Company B, Ninth Maine, who carried the flag, the color-sergeant being wounded is recommended to the Secretary of War for a medal.

THIRD DIVISION

First Lieut. Waldo B. Ryer, Seventh U. S. Colored Troops; First Lieut. Joseph E. Lockwood, Seventh U. S . Colored Troops; First Lieut. Sumner H. Warren, Seventh U.S. Colored Troops are promoted to be captains, for meritorious conduct during their connection with the regiment.

Second Lieut. Alpheus K. Long, Seventh U. S. Colored Troops; Second Lieut. Charles H. C. Brown, Seventh U. S. Colored Troops; Second Lieut. Russell Hall, Seventh U. S. Colored Troops are promoted to first lieutenants, for meritorious services during their connection with the regiment.

Lieut. Col. Samuel C. Armstrong, Ninth U. S. Colored Troops, is promoted for gallant and meritorious services at Deep Bottom and Fussell's Mill, on the 14th of August, 1864, as colonel of the Eighth U. S. Colored Troops, vice Col. Loren Burritt, who has failed to be mustered on account of physical disability.

First Lieut. Thomas Young, Eighth U. S. Colored Troops, is promoted to be captain, for meritorious services.

Second Lieut. William H. Brooks, Eighth U. S. Colored Troops, is promoted to first lieutenant.

First Lieut. Haskell M. Phelps is promoted to be captain in the Ninth U. S. Colored Troops, for meritorious services during his connection with the regiment.

Second Lieut. Edward E. Fairchild, Ninth U. S. Colored Troops, is promoted to first lieutenant for meritorious services during his connection with the regiment.

Second Lieuts. Edward Coe and John Bishop, Twenty-ninth (Connecticut) Colored Volunteers, are appointed first lieutenants, for uniform attention to duty.

First Sergt. Oscar Engleblom, Company G, Third New Hampshire, is appointed second lieutenants, Seventh U. S. Colored Troops, to fill a vacancy.

Major George E. Wagner, Eighth U. S. Colored Troops, is specially mentioned for gallantry, and is appointed lieutenant-colonel, vice Lieutenant-Colonel Armstrong, Ninth U. S. Colored Troops.

Capt Oscar E. Pratt, Seventh U. S. Colored Troops, has honorable mention for meritorious conduct, and is appointed major in the Eighth U. S. Colored Troops, vice Major Wagner, promoted.

Capts. Julius A. Weiss, Thomas McCarty, First Lieuts, George R. Sherman, David S. Mack, Second Lieuts, Sylvester, Eler , J. Ferguson, R. M. Spinnery, of the Seventh U. S. Colored Troops, are all entitled in the highest praise in the assault on Fort Gilmer, for which they are not now promoted, being either killed or in the hands of the enemy.

The commanding general is quite conscious that in his endeavors to put on record the gallant deeds of the officers and soldiers of the Army of the James, he has almost of necessity, because of the imperfection of reports, omitted many deserving of mention, yet, as these gallant men will on other occasions equally distinguished themselves, they can then take their due place in their country's history.

By command of Major-General Butler:

ED W. SMITH
Assistant Adjutant-General

*Awarded a Medal of Honor


SOURCE: United States War Department. THE WAR OF THE REBELLION: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Series I, Volume 42. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1880-1901.

Category: Civil War | Subcategory: Correspondence | Tags: reports , North Carolina , Virginia , Washington
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