Lest We Forget - African American Military History by Researcher, 
					Author and Veteran Bennie McRae, Jr.

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CONTRABANDS

CONTRABANDS

FORGOTTEN HEROES AND HEROINES OF THE CIVIL WAR

Compiled by
Bennie J. McRae, Jr.

Courtesy: William Gladstone, author, "Men of Color"

Thousands of Black men and women served the Union in a paid civilian capacity as spies, scouts, nurses, cooks, laundresses, servants, teamsters, stevedores, foragers, general laborers, field hands and blacksmiths.

Hundreds of invaluable intelligence reports were passed on to Union Army commanders by the contrabands. (See links below)


CONTRABANDS -- "Three slaves of a Virginia owner sought refuge at Fort Monroe, Virginia, on 23 May 1861, and the Southerner demanded their return under the FUGITIVE SLAVE ACT - 1850. Ben Butler refused, saying that since Virginia had seceded, she had no right to the Federal laws. In a report to the Secretary of War 30 July 1861, he referred to the slaves as "contraband of war," and the name came into unofficial usage as the slang term for Negro or slave. The idea of contraband as a doctrine disappeared after the passage of the CONFISCATION ACTS (the first on 6 August 1861)." Mark M. Boatner, III. THE CIVIL WAR DICTIONARY. New York: Vintage Books (A Division of Random House, Inc. 1988, p-172.


CONFISCATION ACTS -- "In order to deprive the Confederacy of the military and economic advantages of slaves, these acts were passed by Congress in 1861 and 1862 to provide that all Negroes used in transportation of stores or munitions or in forts and trenches should br freed. They also stated that all slaves in those areas of the South invaded by the Northern armies would be liberated. Acting without authority, John C. Freemont in Missouri and David Hunter in South Carolina emancipated all slaves in the areas held by them; Lincoln nullified these proclamations, considering them to be politically unsound at that time." Mark M. Boatner, III. THE CIVIL WAR DICTIONARY. New York: Vintage Books (A Division of Random House, Inc. 1988, p-171.


EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION -- "Presidential decree issued 22 September 1862 to take effect 1 January 1863, freeing all slaves in those parts of the nation still in rebellion. In July 1862 Lincoln had proposed such a move to his cabinet and read them a preliminary draft of the proclamation. Seward suggested that he wait. believing that such a dynamic change in the war's focus (heretofore fought to preserve the Union and not to disrupt the South's social fabric) would be little more than a plea for support without a military victory. The Battle of Antietam, while hardly decisive, gave Lincoln that opportunity." Mark M. Boatner, III. THE CIVIL WAR DICTIONARY. New York: Vintage Books (A Division of Random House, Inc. 1988, p-265.

EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION


"Approximately 225,000 black civilians worked for the Government. If the black man would have performed as many services for the South as he did for the North, the results of the war may have been different. By the end of the war, the South realized this fact, and knew that this source of manpower could have been used to aid their cause instead of being utilized by the North", William Gladstone. MEN OF COLOR. Gettysburg: Thomas Publications. 1993,


LINKS TO LETTERS/REPORTS/ARTICLES, ETC.

MULTI-DOCUMENTS EACH LINK

SINGLE DOCUMENT EACH LINK

REPORT #1

REPORT #2

REPORT #3

REPORT #4

REPORT #5

REPORT #6

REPORT #7

REPORT #8

REPORT #9

REPORT #10

REPORT #11

*** MORE TO COME ***

 

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 9 - HILTON HEAD, S.C. 2/6/1862

CHICAGO TRIBUNE - PITTSBURG LANDING, TENN., MAY 30, 1862

RECORD OF THE McDOWELL COURT OF INQUIRY -- 14TH DAY

CONTRABAND CAMPS IN TENNESSEE

REPORT - COLONEL R. D. MUSSEY, 100TH U.S. INFANTRY, COMMISSIONER FOR ORGANIZATION U. S. COLORED TROOPS

 

*** MORE TO COME ***


 

 


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Category: | Subcategory: | Tags: Virginia , Tennessee , Missouri
Related Topics / Keywords / Phrases: 1850, 1861, 1862, 1863, 1988, 1993, 2007, Chicago (Illinois), Civil War, Fort Monroe (Virginia), Gettysburg (Pennsylvania), Lincoln, Missouri, New York, Ohio, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia,